Tag Archives: whole-foods

Maui – On the Road to Hana

We decided to drive the supposedly totally off-the-beaten-track but spectacular Road to Hana along Maui’s northeast coast. The warnings were universal – take lots of water and food, gas up the car – there’s nothing along the whole route – perhaps 55+/-miles with 58 bridges (many one-lane wide) and over 250 serious curves – plus untold vistas and one-car-wide pull-offs.  So the estimate is about 4 hours to get to Hana and as long to get back – with stops at the top five attractions.  The warnings also advised against taking the “dotted line” road back to Wailea that would complete the circuit – so we had to come back the same way or void our car rental agreement if we were found out…

Consequently, we wasted a good hour getting prepared for this major odyssey in our little fire-engine red convertible  – about half the rentals in Maui are convertibles and most of them were headed to Hana at the same time we were.  Many of the warnings proved over the top or just plain wrong.  Except one – there are 58 bridges, most one-lane wide – and over 250 curves – so no wine and beer on this trip.  But were were happy that we had provisioned at Down to Earth – an organic, all natural market just south of the Hana Road that makes delicious plant-based sandwiches ($7.99 each) – subs and wraps –  and offers a wide range of “healthy” chips, drinks and well-priced water.  downtoearth.org.

Maui’s Down to Earth store just south of the road to Hana

The drive was made far more interesting because we rented a GyPSy GPS program that provided fascinating commentary on what we were passing or stopped at – along with a lot of history and anecdotes during the long stretches of  gorgeous scenery.

Our experience was that there are services along the way – but maybe not year round – so check.  There’s a small cluster of shops and snack bars, tiny family-run roadside stands – some offering fruit, vegs, burgers or pastries.  And there is a gas station in Hana along with some basic dining options, an “historic General Store” that has seen better days, and a resort.  FYI: several people told us later that the “dotted line road,” which would have made this an even more interesting drive, is just fine at this time of year and we should have taken it.

For images of the Road to Hana, please see this link to Pinterest.

Why a Plant-Based (aka Vegan) Diet? The films that tell the story

Sometimes it’s hard to tell someone about eating a whole-foods, plant-based diet without sounding like you are proselytizing – a big no, no IMO. So offering a film that says it all in a non-threatening way is a gret way to go. It worked for us. A friend gave us Mike Andersen’s  Eating DVD – right on the heels of having read T. Colin Campbell’s The China Study – and that changed the food habits of five or six people.

There are some superb films and DVDs that have been produced recently that make a clear case for a WFPBD. This my list of personal favorites:

Forks Over Knives (2011) created by Brian Wendel, featuring T. Colin Campbell,  Caldwell Esselstyn and Neal Barnard

Got the Facts on Milk? (The Milk Documentary) (2011, 2007) by Shira Lane. Effectively questions the health benefits of milk and dairy products. Features T. Colin Campbell,  Caldwell Esselstyn and Neal Barnard

Fat, Sick and Nearly Dead (2010) by Joe Cross. A personal documentary of a person with an autoimmune disease taking back his health care and trading in his pills for a juicer.

Fresh (2009) by Ana Jones. Features Joe Salatin, Will Allen, David  Ball. Takes a hard look at our food production system and the negative impact of agribusiness. Takes up where Food, Inc. leaves off adding possible solutions.

Eating, 3rd Ed. (2008) a DVD on the RAVE Diet by Mike Andersen (also a book).  An earlier version of this  film convinced us to change from a  whole-foods, sugar & meat-free diet to a total Whole Foods Plant-Based Diet (a bigger change than one might think).

Food Inc. (2008) directed by Robert Kenner. Features Michael Pollack. Champions more compassionate treatment of meat animals, but does not support a plant-based-only diet

Food Matters (2008) by James Colquhoun & Laurentine ten  Bosch. Features Charlotte Gerson, Andrew Saul, Dan Rogers, David Wolfe,

Fast Food Nation (2006).  Looks at the destructive impact of eating meat on health, animals and the environment

Super Size Me (2004). Morgan Spurlock’s 30-days on a McDonald’s-only diet

Foodmatters

Reference List for Plant-Based (aka Vegan) Gurus

While I don’t agree completely with any of these sources,  they are, IMO, all very good and each makes a solid case for his/her slightly different perspective.

T. Colin Campbell, PhD
The China Study (2004)
Caldwell B. Esselstyn, Jr., MD
Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease: The Revolutionary, Scientifically Proven, Nutrition-Based Cure (2008)
Joel Fuhrman, MD
Eat to Live: The Amazing Nutrient-Rich Program for Fast and Sustained Weight Loss, Revised Edition (2011)
Annemarie Colbin, PhD
The Whole-Food Guide to Strong Bones: A Holistic Approach (2009)
Neal Barnard, MD
Dr. Neal Barnard’s Program for Reversing Diabetes: The Scientifically Proven System for Reversing Diabetes without Drugs  (2008)
Andrew Weill, MD
Spontaneous Happiness (2011)
Mark Hyman, MD
The Blood Sugar Solution: The UltraHealthy Program for Losing Weight, Preventing Disease, and Feeling Great Now!  (2012)
John McDougall, MD
The Starch Solution: Eat the Foods You Love, Regain Your Health, and Lose the Weight for Good!  (2012)
Dean Ornish, MD
The Spectrum: A Scientifically Proven Program to Feel Better, Live Longer, Lose Weight, and Gain Health (2008)
Joan Dye Gussow, PhD
Growing, OlderA Chronicle of Death, Life and Vegetables (2010)

For how we got into this mess and what we need to do to get out of it:

David Kessler’s  The End of Overeating
Doug Lisle’s The Pleasure Principle
Stewart Brand’s The Whole Earth Discipline

And for the best overall, easy to understand take on WFPBD, I love Julieanna Hever’s Complete Idiots Guide to Plant-Based Nutrition

Dr. John McDougall Challenges Paula Dean

Whole-food, plant-based Diet Guru John McDougall has challenged cook book author and TV personality Paula Dean to a bet.  He has invited Ms. Dean, who recently admitted that she has Type 2 Diabetes, to spend ten days at his center learning how to eat healthfully.

Dr. McDougall’s bet:  “Would we love a trim-looking Paula Deen on a cooking show? How would we react if she lost weight and cured her diabetes right in front of our eyes? I am willing to make a giant effort to help Paula help herself and America become trimmer and healthier. I am publically inviting her to my 10-day, live-in clinic in Santa Rosa, CA. As an added incentive, I am offering her a Mitt Romney size bet* that my Program will change her personal health and her style of cooking on her future TV shows. Furthermore, if she attends my program and does not make the significant positive changes that I predict, then I will be a guest on her cooking show and eat sliced beef wrapped in bacon strips and fried in chicken fat. Otherwise, if the McDougall Program does, as I confidently predict, cause her to lose weight, lower her blood sugar, and get her off her diabetic drugs, then she will agree to be a speaker at my next Advanced Study Weekend, September 7-9, 2012, and prepare a five-course, low-fat vegan meal with a starch centerpiece, ending with a healthy dessert.”

http://www.drmcdougall.com/misc/2012nl/jan/deen.htm

Sadly, it appears that she is using this platform to promote the diabetes drug, Victoza.